what’s your Chemical Body Burden?

by | Jul 23, 2020 | Health and Fitness, Staff Picks | 0 comments

Share

Today let’s talk about our “Chemical Body Burden.” The amount of chemicals in your body.
The average person uses about nine personal care products per day, ranging from the nonstick pot used to fry scrambled eggs, microwave, air fresheners in your house, cars and office, bathing soap, body cream, hair cream, deodorants, shampoo, relaxer, hair conditioners, makeups and many use lots more. Let’s just say you use 12 products. Do you know that equals 168 unique chemicals you’re exposed to daily? According to the EWG, 1of every 13 women are exposed to a known or suspected carcinogen, every day, while 1 out of every 23 men are. Ladies are guilty of loading their bodies with chemicals in the name of organic soap, whitening and ebony creams trending on social media. What’s even more concerning is that the products are not labelled, tested or trusted.
Toxic chemicals, occurring naturally and man-made, often get into the human body. It can be inhaled, swallowed through contaminated food or water, or in some cases, absorbed through skin. Researches have shown most herbicides and pesticides finds their way into our food. Recently a video of a man preserving bags of beans and stock fish with snipper got people talking on internet but this is just the tips of an iceberg. Scientists estimate that everyone alive today carries within her or his body at least 700 contaminants.
A significant amount of these toxic chemicals, buildup in human systems and takes a horrific twist overtime. While our body can excrete some of these toxic chemicals, not all are readily excreted. Most can remain for years in our blood, adipose (fat) tissue, semen, muscle, bone, brain tissue, or other organs. Chlorinated pesticides, such as DDT, can remain in the body for 50 years. Still wondering why human fertility has declined significantly over the last decade? Women of reproductive age now suffer from Pcos and men suffering from Sperm counts have taken a nosedive. Researches have shown BPA, or bisphenol-A, is a chemical that mimics sex hormones estrogen is a component of polycarbonate plastics and Parabens and phthalates are two of the most commonly chemicals gotten from deodorants. All of which upset endocrine function affecting reproduction.
Toxic chemicals can cause a long list of health problems ranging from direct damage to the lungs, liver, kidney, bones, blood, brain and other nerves, and the reproductive systems. Exposures to chemicals or metals are potential missiles for cancer; high blood pressure; asthma; deficits in attention, memory, learning, and IQ; Parkinson’s-like diseases; infertility; shortened lactation; endometriosis; genital malformation; peripheral nerve damage; and dysfunctional immune systems.
“It’s important for people to realize that a little change in lifestyle can lower one’s exposure to toxic chemicals, they include:
• Avoid canned foods and beverages, because they are often preserved with chemicals
• Wash foodstuffs from the market or farm properly before consumption, use vinegar or baking soda.
• Eat organic foods, fresh or frozen fruits and vegetables instead of fast foods. This limits your exposure to BPA, a toxic substance used in the lining of most cans.
• Use less plastic. Choose glass, stainless steel or ceramic containers for food. Don’t use plastic containers for hot foods or drinks and use glass instead of plastic in the microwave, because heat makes plastic release chemicals. At best, avoid microwave.
• Limit foods high in animal fat because toxic substances build up and gets stored in fat.
• Toxic substances like lead, pesticides are present in household dust, so avoid wearing shoes into the house or always use a wet mop or wet cloth to clean floors and flat surfaces regularly.
• Use nontoxic personal care products or organic products that are tested and trusted.
• Ventilate your rooms by opening the windows for natural air


Share

Check Out These Related Posts

What happened to apprenticeship?

What happened to apprenticeship?

During the pre-colonial days, apprenticeship was the mode of training. It was a common feature of the traditional setting to see people engage in a vocation such as farming, fishing, hunting, carving, carpentry, sculpting, painting, building, decorating, catering,...

read more

0 Comments

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

WhatsApp chat
error: Content is protected !!